What are the signs and symptoms of a concussion?

Symptoms of concussion are generally organized into four groups: (1) thinking/remembering symptoms, (2) physical symptoms, (3) emotional/mood symptoms, and (4) sleep symptoms.

A person suffering from a concussion may have difficulty thinking clearly, concentrating, or remembering new information.  They may describe a feeling of being “slowed down” in their thinking.  I have seen this in clients as they sit in my office trying to describe things to me.

As for physical symptoms, the person may experience headaches, fuzzy or blurry vision, nausea or vomiting, dizziness, sensitivity to light or noise, balance problems, or a feeling of fatigue or lack of energy.

Emotional and mood symptoms include irritability, sadness and depression, a tendency to be more emotional than normal, and a feeling of nervousness or anxiety.

A person’s sleep may be affected as well.  The person may sleep more than usual or less than usual.  Also, they may have difficulty falling asleep.

It is important to understand that some of these symptoms may not appear right away.  In fact, some of them may not be noticed for weeks or even months after an injury when the person resumes his or her daily life activities (work, school, etc.).  Because of this time delay, the victim of a concussion may not admit they’re having problems and may not understand why they’re having difficulties.  This, of course, leads to more anxiety.  Also, family, friends and coworkers may not notice the problems and symptoms, as the person appears “normal.”

Kevin W. Mottley
Kevin W. Mottley, Richmond, VA trial lawyer dedicated to handling brain and other serious injury claims